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1.) Cooking bacon with less mess
Place a rack in the lower third of the oven then preheat the oven to 400°F: . If you’re cooking multiple sheets of bacon, position a second rack in the top third of the oven. Line a baking sheet with foil (this makes cleanup easier) and arrange the bacon on a baking sheet. Bake until the bacon is golden-brown and crispy, it should take 15 to 20 minutes. Exact baking time will depend on the thickness of the bacon and how crispy you like it. Begin checking around 12 minutes to monitor how quickly the bacon is cooking. The bacon fat will sputter and bubble as the bacon cooks, but shouldn’t splatter the way it does on the stove top.

2.) Keeping that take home food order warm until you get home
Keep a hot water bottle / bag (like the ones most of us use for injuries or for the ladies the ones we use to help with cramps ) in the vehicle and when you go to pick up your order ask for some hot water. Put said hot water in the water bottle and place it under your take out order, between the heat from the food and the heat from the water bottle your food will stay warmer twice as long.

3.) The egg slicer has more than one use
–  If you have an egg slicer, did you know it also works wonders with slicing mushrooms, strawberries, grape tomatoes and many other small food items.

4.) How to quickly remove burnt bits from bread or other baked items
Did those cookies/biscuits you made get a little burnt on the bottom, no need to toss them all, just use a microplane grater on the bottom of them. All the yummy goodness of your freshly baked goodies without the burnt parts.

5.) No more cutting up butter for baking
– When a baking recipe calls for  butter, such as a fruit crisp or a breadcrumb-covered casserole (it adds richness and helps browning), grate chilled butter on the large holes of a flat grater to create uniform pieces that are easier to distribute.

6.)  Defrost meat on an aluminum tray
– If you can’t defrost in water (still the fastest method), aluminum is an excellent heat conductor and will cut the defrost time by about 30 percent, according to Serious Eats – much faster than a ceramic plate or plastic cutting board.

7.) D.I.Y cooking spray
– 1 part oil + 5 parts water + squirt bottle = cooking spray for half the cost of store bought

8.) Squeeze spinach with a sushi mat or potato ricer
– Smooshing thawed spinach in a strainer or wringing it out in a paper towel is messy and not very effective. You can easily remove the excess water in thawed spinach by rolling it in a sushi mat lined with a paper towel or gently squashing it in a potato ricer. This trick comes in handy when you’re making something like Easy Spinach Lasagna, spinach dip, spanakopita, and other recipes that call for frozen spinach to be thawed and drained.

9.) Save $200 and vacuum-seal food storage bags with a straw
– Use a straw to suck out excess air in a zip-top bag. Removing the air from storage bags protects the food better and helps it last a little longer. Note: You might not want to use this trick if you’re sealing up a bag of raw meat.

10.) The smarter way to chill wine
– Stop using ice cubes to chill your glass of wine and try throwing in some frozen grapes instead. All the greatness of a nicely chilled wine without it getting watered down.

11.) Make your banana’s last longer
– Tired of buying banana’s and having them ripe faster than you can eat them? Next time just wrap some plastic wrap around the top part of the bundle, it will slow down the process of them getting ripe.

12.) Minced garlic every time
–  Instead of trying to chop a clove of garlic into super small piece try using a microplaner instead. You’ll get perfect minced garlic every time.